The Classic Tales Podcast
Every week, join award-winning narrator B.J. Harrison as he narrates the greatest stories the world has ever known. From the jungles of South America to the Mississippi Delta, from Victorian England to the Gothic castles of Eastern Europe, join us on a fantastic journey through the words of the world's greatest authors. Critically-acclaimed and highly recommended for anyone who loves a good story with plenty of substance.

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Blood-sucking. Hypnotizing. Shape shifting. Magical. Is this a vampire? No. It’s a Lamia. John Keats, today on The Classic Tales Podcast.

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The Enchiridion for the month of October is the third of four installments of Jules Verne’s classic, 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. Supporting members get access to the monthly Enchiridion, which is a 3-4 hour-long portion of a new audiobook title, as well as an $8 credit for anything in the store. It only costs $5 a month to become a supporting member. Your monthly support really helps us keep The Classic Tales going strong, and it really is a great value. Thank you for your support.

The Lamia is the predecessor to the modern vampire. She is originally from Greek Mythology. Lamia was a mistress of the God Zeus. After a run-in with Zeus’ jealous wife Hera, Lamia was turned into a monster that devours children, resembling a snake.

Mothers throughout Europe used to frighten their children with stories of the Lamia, in hopes to induce good behavior.

Later traditions refer to many Lamiae. These were folkloric monsters similar to vampires and succubae that seduced young men and fed on their blood.

Today’s tale is a narrative poem composed of rhyming couplets. It tells the story of a rather sympathetic Lamia who is granted human form by the God Hermes. The major source of Keats’ material for the poem was a brief passage in Robert Burton’s The Anatomy of Melancholy, published in 1621. It tells of the marriage of a 25 year old philosopher, Menippus Lycius, to “a phantasm in the habit of a fair gentlewoman”.

And now, Lamia, by John Keats.

Direct download: CT_545_Lamia.mp3
Category:Literature -- posted at: 11:46pm MST